How are the Flu and Coronavirus the Same – and Different?

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How are the Flu and Coronavirus the Same – and Different?

College Tips
How are the Flu and Coronavirus the Same – and Different?
Herzing Staff
March 12, 2020

If you’re concerned about the coronavirus (COVID-19), you’re obviously not alone. The virus is on the minds of most of us and it can be a bit scary because we’re learning more about it just about every day.

Coronavirus is a respiratory illness that has similarities to the flu, experts say, which also means some of the prevention guidelines are the same or similar. For example, the  Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends several ways to avoid getting either coronavirus or the flu:

  • Do not have close contact with people who are sick
  • Stay home from work, school and other public get-togethers when you are sick
  • Cover your mouth and nose when sneezing or coughing
  • Wash your hands with soap and water, or at least an alcohol-based hand rub
  • Avoid touching your face, specifically your eyes, nose or mouth
  • Be sure to clean and disinfect surfaces that are frequently touched
  • Keep on a schedule of adequate sleep, exercise and nutritious eating

Other similarities with coronavirus and the flu, according to  Johns Hopkins Medicine, include:

  • They can cause cough, body aches, fever and fatigue
  • Both range from mild to severe, even fatal in rare situations
  • Transmission of the viruses can occur through air droplets from coughing, sneezing or talking
  • Both have an incubation period during which you might not realize you have symptoms

That said, experts still have a lot to learn about coronavirus and the situation is evolving rapidly. That’s why it’s important to follow these guidelines, as they are the best advice scientists and infectious disease experts can offer at this time.

Herzing University Administration and Campus Leadership are working closely with campus partners, local and state agencies and the CDC to stay informed of the coronavirus and provide updates when available.

For the most up-to-date information on the virus across the U.S. and world, visit the CDC website.

Learn More About Coronavirus

Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook. Multiple factors, including prior experience, age, geography and degree field, affect career outcomes. Herzing does not guarantee a job, promotion, salary increase or other career growth. BLS estimates do not represent entry-level wages and/or salary.

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